To win the match required 2 wickets and 2 overs left, the captain gave the ball to the part-time bowler instead of giving it to the regular bowler. The batsman then conceded 77 runs in one over. In cricket, if someone is asked how many runs can be given in an over, people will usually say 36 runs. It is also possible to score 36 runs by hitting 6 sixes in 6 balls which is a feat done by Indian batsman Yuvraj Singh. But in one match it also happened that the captain did not want to end the match as a draw and so what he did before the last 2 overs of the last day of the match was turned upside down for the team and the difficulty ended later. The match was drawn on the last ball. The bowler, who was brought for the reverse fair, conceded 77 runs in 1 over. This disgusting record was set on February 20, 1990.


The record-making bowler is Burt Vance, who played 4 Tests for New Zealand and scored 77 runs in an over against Canterbury, who played for Wellington in a first-class match at Lancaster Park 31 years from today. Interestingly, during Wench's bowling, the umpire also forgot how many balls he bowled after 5 identical balls and finally completed. He was to win his last match against Canterbury to capture the Shell Trophy in the Wellington squad. However, another match was being played between Auckland and Otago at the time and two more matches of the tournament were yet to be played. But Wellington, who is showing a great game, needs to win that match to win the championship. Because the rest of the teams were behind in terms of average. On the other hand, if Washington loses its last match, other teams such as Auckland, Canterbury, and Middle District will have a chance to move on with points. Even though Wellington had gained 4 points in their first innings, it was possible to stay behind a team. Had Canterbury won the match, they would have beaten Wellington. However, for him, it will depend on the match between the other teams.

Wellington set a target of 291 runs in 59 overs on the final day to win against Canterbury. Wellington started brilliantly and took 8 wickets for 108 runs on the scoreboard. Wellington's team was just 2 wickets away from victory. Canterbury's wicketkeeper-batsman Lee German and No. 10 batsman Roger Ford survived the pitch and joined the effort to take the match to a draw. Seeing the match and title slip away with his hands, Wellington captain Irwin Maxven decided to switch to bowling and was a part-time bowler rather than a regular bowler and handed the bowling to Vance. Vance was originally a batsman. Which led to the possibility of a break up of the German and Forced pair. Seeing the new bowler, the batsman will be out in the process of scoring fast runs. But that did not happen. The team needed 95 runs off 12 balls which seemed impossible. Canterbury's team scored 196 for 8 wickets. So Vance was against the Germans for 75, but after bowling the first ball, Vance had to bowl 15 times. So that only 2 bowls were considered suitable in the initial 17 attempts. Full toss followed by full toss. The Germans took full advantage of this and in between, they hit sixes off 5 consecutive balls.

This bowler bowled 17 balls. Germany completed the century on the seventh ball of that over. When that spell was over, the Germans scored 70 runs with 8 sixes and 5 fours in their account before that over, while Ford also had a chance and scored 5 runs off 2 balls with four fours. The special thing is that out of the 22 balls he threw, 5 balls did not get any runs, out of which only 3 balls were considered suitable. The situation became so bad that scoring spectators were asked to remember how runs were being scored. The umpire also got tired and Burt Vance (1-0-77-0) also bowled 5 good balls and the umpire inadvertently completed the over. The scoreboard could not be updated until the last over. An interesting incident also took place where Canterbury needed 18 runs to win in the final over. The batsman scored 17 runs in the first 5 balls but the batsman could not score the last ball and the match was drawn.